West

West
West

The West is a region of scenic beauty on a grand scale. All of its 11 states are partly mountainous, and the ranges are the sources of startling contrasts. To the west of the peaks, winds from the Pacific Ocean carry enough moisture to keep the land well-watered.

Alaska

Alaska

The nickname of the 49th state, Alaska, is the “Last Frontier.”

Arizona

Arizona

The “Grand Canyon State,” Arizona, was the 48th state to join the U.S. in 1912– the last of 48 contiguous (connected) states to join the Union.

California

California

Nicknamed the “Golden State,” California is the third largest state in area after Alaska and Texas.

Colorado

Colorado

Called the “Centennial State,” because it became the 38th state when the U.S. turned 100 in 1876, Colorado is most closely associated with the Rocky Mountains and has numerous peaks over 14,000 feet.

Hawaii

Hawaii

Known as the “Aloha State” (in Hawaiian, “aloha” can mean “hello”), Hawaii is a group of volcanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean that together became the 50th state in 1959.

Idaho

Idaho

Idaho, the 43rd state, joined the U.S. in 1890.

Montana

Montana

Montana is known as “Big Sky Country”.

Nevada

Nevada

Nevada’s name comes from the Spanish word meaning “snow clad”–a reference to the snow-covered peaks of the Sierra Nevada.

New Mexico

New Mexico

In 1540, the Spanish conquistador Coronado trekked through the area known today as New Mexico in search of the fabled seven cities of gold.

Oregon

Oregon

Spanish sailors in search of a northwest passage were the first Europeans to see what is known today as Oregon.

Utah

Utah

The state known as Utah began when Brigham Young led a group of Mormon pilgrims seeking freedom from religious persecution into the Great Salt Lake Valley, where they established a settlement in 1847.

Washington

Washington

In 1853, the Washington Territory was formed from part of the Oregon Territory.

Wyoming

Wyoming

Wyoming gets its name from the Algonquin words for “land of vast plains.”