Kentucky

Kentucky
Kentucky

Daniel Boone and other frontiersmen settled in Kentucky, the “Bluegrass State,” in 1769. Its name comes from the Iroquois Indian word “Ken-tah-ten,” or “land of tomorrow.” Admitted into the Union in 1792, Kentucky is the 15th state and the first state west of the Appalachian Mountains. Today, Kentucky is associated with coal mines and horse farms and racing. America’s most prestigious horse race, the Kentucky Derby, is held in Louisville annually. The state flower is the goldenrod, the cardinal is the state bird and Frankfort is the capital.

Capital City: Frankfort
Nickname: Bluegrass State
Motto: United we stand, divided we fall
Statehood: June 1, 1792 (15th)
Origin of State’s Name: Based on the Iroquois Indian word “Ken-tah-ten,” meaning “land of tomorrow.” or “dark and bloody ground”
Largest Cities: Louisville
Border States: Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia
Land Area: 39,732 sq. mi.; 36th largest
State Bird: Cardinal
State Flower: Goldenrod (solidago altissima)
State Tree: Tulip Poplar
State Song: My Old Kentucky Home, Blue Moon of Kentucky (bluegrass song)