Promoting prosperity in the Indo-Pacific

By ShareAmerica
September 6, 2019

The Trump administration’s strategy for the Indo-Pacific region is based on the belief that nations in that region should be independent, strong, and satellites to none.

“Our Indo-Pacific vision is about developing … deep and respectful relationships, based on security, respect for the rule of law, and mutually beneficial economic development,” U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea Harry Harris said September 4 at the Indian Ocean Conference.

The U.S. enjoys partnerships with India, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Australia, Singapore, New Zealand, Thailand, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Maldives, among other Indo-Pacific nations.

The conference, held in Maldives, focused on themes of ecology, terrorism, and navigational security — all issues that concern both small island nations and larger continental countries.

Central to the implementation of security and good governance lies U.S. companies’ economic investments in the Indo-Pacific, which have doubled over the last decade. “When we invest, we create jobs, not debt,” Ambassador Harris said.

The U.S. remains the foremost investor in the Indo-Pacific region, producing:

  • More than 5.1 million jobs.
  • $1.8 trillion in two-way trade in 2017.
  • 14 trade-and-investment framework agreements.

The end results? Historic and unprecedented friendships between countries and the improved livelihood of nations large and small.

“Make no mistake about it, the United States is an Indo-Pacific nation — always has been and always will be,” Harris said.